On the Design of an "Easy-to-Integrate" Care Coordination Platform

Remember that scene in Apollo 13 where they figure out that the air scrubbers are wearing out, and that the astronauts will soon be choking on their own carbon dioxide? Building software for healthcare is a lot like that. That was my face after I settled in and began to understand the complexity of the environments in which our new software would sit. There are dozens, or even hundreds of other applications in a typical hospital system, each of which has its own data, sometimes duplicated, often inconsistent. There are systems tracking patients, care plans, medications, appointments, surgeries, surgeons, nurses, support staff, accounts, billing, and so on. We were going to bring one more application to an already crowded pool party.

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Every Successful Relationship is a Two-Way Street

As was typical, I was mapping out my upcoming week based on my husband’s travel schedule. Most parents will know what I mean by coordinating child care. Who picks up the kids, where to pick them up, when to pick them up, where to take them, when to feed them, what to feed them, when to bathe them – and that’s just your average Tuesday. It becomes that much more complex when I’m sharing those tasks since I work. Juggling work priorities with the critical Mom priorities is a balancing act. In addition to my husband, I collaborate with the nanny, other moms, the kids’ grandparents, Amazon Prime, and many, many others to keep all the balls in the air. So, this past Valentine’s day, I was thankful for all my partners and for the technology that enables seamless two-way communication such as shared to do lists, shared calendars, texts, and emails. Not to mention the aligned incentives in doing a good job, some financial but mostly love!

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The CMS CCJR Rule – From “Must Do” to “Must Have”

I do not envy hospitals or provider organizations in this very fluid phase of US healthcare. Change is everywhere, and it can come out of nowhere. Consider a newly proposed mandatory rule affecting 75 metropolitan areas including more than 800 hospitals. Obviously another compulsory rule is a distraction to your clinicians, your initiatives, and your strategy. It may seem like Meaningful Use all over again. But this rule proposal is different. If harnessed correctly it can create resources to optimize clinician performance, expand initiatives, and add a strategic advantage to your organization’s portfolio.

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